2001. Dharma World, Sept./Oct. (English, Korean)
PRESS RELEASE/Magazine 2007/03/11 13:31
 

Designs That Transcend Fashion

by Jacqueline Ruyak


A South Korean artist says she was late in learning the true meaning of Buddhism, and this is what she seeks to capture in her fashion designs that feature dramatic but always tasteful images of buddhas and bodhisattvas.



  A bright light in the South Korean art world, Lee Ki-hyang creates clothing designs that are grounded in heartfelt Buddhist sensibility. For a decade now, this unusual contemporary artist has been making sublime use of Buddhist motifs in her wearable art. Clothing, she says, is part of life itself, and creating art is a form of devotion to the Buddha and to all of humankind. "My prayer," she says, "is that people will come to know about Buddhism through wearing or seeing my art."

  Lee traveled far to find her way to clothing design and Buddhism. As an art student in Seoul in the late 1979s, she majored in sculpture, then went on to study printmaking at the Art Institute of Chicago. She liked working with color but did not like the acids and solvents used in printmaking. In 1985, while her husband was studying for a doctorate in business administration at Harvard University, Lee started attending classes at the School of Fashion Design in Boston. She quickly realized that fashion design was the field for her. After finishing at the school, she laded a job as a children's fashion designer, but eight months later her husband obtained a short-term position in Germany and the couple left the United States.

  On returning to South Korea after almost ten years abroad, Lee went through a period of confusion. "I wondered who I was, where I had come from, and what I was doing," she says. "I had to find out, too, what my country was all about. I realized that I was trained in the European art tradition and knew little about Korean art."

  When her mother-in-law, a devout Buddhist, suggested that she study Buddhism, Lee resisted the idea. "When I was living in the States, my mother-in-law always used to send me letters that I later realized had a touch of Buddhism about them. They were about everyday things but flavored with Buddhism. At the time, though, I still confused Buddhism with shamanism, and I didn't like shamanism because of the strong colors associated with it."

  Although she was not much interested, Lee eventually attended a series of lectures on Buddhist fundamentals, and the lectures ended up changing her life. "I was stunned to discover what Buddhism was really about," she says. "I was chagrined that I hadn't encountered it until I was thirty-five, but so happy that I finally did. Buddhism teaches that everyone is a potential buddha and able therefore to fulfill their boundless possibilities. I felt there was much to do before I died, much to show the world."

  Shortly after her return to South Korea, Lee was offered a teaching post at a two-year college of fashion design. That led, in 1992, to her master's degree in design. She numerous group exhibitions in her own country, in Germany, and in the United States. Since 1996 she has been an assistant professor in the Division of Fashion Design and Business at Hansung University in Seoul, where she teaches courses in wearable art and design process. She also does research on a variety of topics related to Korean textiles and costume.

  With her husband, Yoo Pil-hwa, now a professor of marketing and a fellow Buddhist, Lee continues to deepen her faith and enrich her appreciation of Buddhist art, having made pilgrimages to India and Myanmar (Burma) and to Buddhist sites in China. In future she hopes to have an audience with Dalai Lama in Dharamsala and to visit Tibet.

  In 1994 Lee traveled to Japan with her daughter to study at the Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo. She was hesitant about going to Japan because of the history of brutal Japanese treatment of the Koreans after Japan annexed the Korean peninsula. At the same time, she was curious, because Japan is a "prosperous Buddhist country with much to offer."

  In Japan, Lee says, she learned that real Buddhism is not found in sutras but in behavior to other people. She happened to meet some followers of a new Buddhist sect called Shinnyo-en. They impressed her with how they applied the Buddhist teaching to daily life and practiced them with a thoughtful consideration of others that embodied the Buddha's words.

  Back in Seoul again in 1995, the artist immersed herself in preparing for "Towards the World Beyond," a solo exhibition held late that year. It took her nine months to create the nine costumes for the show, which were inspired by the hanging paintings displayed in Korean temple courtyards for sacred performances of music and dance. These performances by specially dressed priests in homage to the Buddha were once common at Korean temples. The costumes in "Towards the World Beyond," all of cotton, were painted by hand with often dramatic yet always refined images of Amitabul (Amitabha), the paradisiac buddha; Sokkamoni (Shakyamuni), the historical buddha; Kwanseum (Avalokiteshvara), the bodhisattva of the nether world; and Tongjin, the bodhisattva who protects the lotus of the True Law. Others depict graceful mudras (hand gestures), devas (celestial beings), and lotus blossoms.

  In Buddhism Lee had found the answer to her personal confusion an well as an appreciation for Korean arts, culture, and history. Traditional Buddhist paintings impress with their freshness of color and composition. Classical Buddhist painters, says Lee, both express their time and proclaim the breadth of Buddhist thought. She believes that contemporary creators of Buddhist art must likewise create works that combine modern sensibility with the richness of tradition.

  When working on the costumes for the 1996 show, she was always aware that the images she was painting would ultimately be fitted on the human body. "All the while I was painting, I was thinking about breasts, waists, hips, and legs and exaggerating all these parts of the body, making the waist slimmer, hips bigger, and so on. Then I put the painted fabric on a mannequin, moved it around, and decided where to change and deform things. After that, I made the pattern, then cut the fabric."

  Though inspired by Korean and Chinese Buddhist paintings and murals, Lee did not just reproduce ancient images. The faces on her buddhas and bodhisattvas are not those of traditional Korean Buddhist art; rather they reflect her view of things in 1995. Some Buddhist priests who attended the show were not happy with those faces, but their criticism did not bother Lee. "My job is to make Buddhist art live in the modern world and to make people happy. I want to be a messenger of the Buddha's teaching to the world. To me, making my designs and religion are the same." Nonetheless, she dislikes being called a "Buddhist artist."

  "I'm an artist. I do what I do not just for other Buddhists, but for people all over the world. I admire American artists who make art out of their national flag, and that's the kind of thing I'm trying to do," Lee says.

  Korean Buddhism and shamanism both make use of vivid colors that are not much to the artist's liking. She prefers complementary colors, which she always tones down with gray. "I like aquamarine blues through emerald greens, but have to be careful not to use them too much. Oranges and greens are much more Korean." For the show she used greens and oranges in subtle shades, toned down with natural lights and darks to suggest a patina. "I cannot work without gray," emphasizes Lee, who also antiqued the fabric surface by later painting cracks on it. "I very much like the delicate patina that comes with age."

  One of her strongest supporters, her mother-in-law, almost every day brings friends, relatives, and people from her temple to Lee's shows and exhibits. "We live with my parents-in-law," Lee says. "I am very grateful because I am able to do what I want to outside the house and the take care of things at home. It's the Buddhist concept of family support, and such harmony between the generations is quite unusual these days."

  "Mandala Revelation," Lee's next major solo show, was held in 1999. If the underlying theme of the 1995 show was Buddhism in general, that of the 1999 show was the Lotus Sutra. "Reading this magnificent epic," Lee says, "moved me to tears and great joy because it convinced me that every human being can become a buddha. It gave me absolute confidence in human beings because of their innate buddha-natures. I felt waves of sincere gratitude that I was able to encounter the Dharma in this life." The sutra also reminded her of Mount Gridhrakuta (Vulture Peak), which she had visited in India.

  Lee based her show on the oldest and most elaborate Korean Buddhist ceremony, called youngsanjae, which is performed is praise of the Buddha and the truth of his teaching. It commemorates a spectacle that took place twenty-five centuries ago on Mount Gridhrakuta (called Youngsan in Korean), the auspicious vulture-shaped peak in India. The purpose of the ceremony, Lee explains, is to bring the Buddha's teachings to all beings, living and dead, through song and dance. In this way, the spirits of the dead are led to salvation and paradise, flowers rain down from the heavens, and the earth shakes six times to celebrate the joyous event. The ceremony, once an occasion for a village festival, starts with the symbolic arrival of buddhas and bodhisattvas from all over the universe, followed by the ritual cleansing of the dead spirits. Tapestries, paintings, and handmade paper lotuses and other flowers decorate the temple courtyard and hall, and chants, songs, and dances are performed. The spirits listen to the teachings and are saved.

  "Although it is a profound religious ceremony dedicated to saving the world and even the spirits of the dead," Lee says, "the youngsanjae is a composite art form executed in festival-like atmosphere. It is amazing to me that the Lotus Sutra Deals with universal space and time and legs and exaggerating all these parts of the body, making the waist slimmer, hips bigger, and so on. Then I put the painted fabric on a mannequin, moved it around, and decided where to change and deform things. After that, I made the pattern, then cut the fabric."

  Though inspired by Korean and Chinese Buddhist paintings and murals, Lee did not just reproduce ancient images. The faces on her buddhas and bodhisattvas are not those of traditional Korean Buddhist art; rather they reflect her view of things in 1995. Some Buddhist priests who attended the show were not happy with those faces, but their criticism did not bother Lee. "My job is to make Buddhist art live in the modern world and to make people happy. I want to be a messenger of the Buddha's teaching to the world. To me, making my designs and religion are the same." Nonetheless, she dislikes being called a "Buddhist artist."

  "I'm an artist. I do what I do not just for other Buddhists, but for people all over the world. I admire American artists who make art out of their national flag, and that's the kind of thing I'm trying to do," Lee says.

  Korean Buddhism and shamanism both make use of vivid colors that are not much to the artist's liking. She prefers complementary colors, which she always tones down with gray. "I like aquamarine blues through emerald greens, but have to be careful not to use them too much. Oranges and greens are much more Korean." For the show she used greens and oranges in subtle shades, toned down with natural lights and darks to suggest a patina. "I cannot work without gray," emphasizes Lee, who also antiqued the fabric surface by later painting cracks on it. "I very much like the delicate patina that comes with age."

  One of her strongest supporters, her mother-in-law, almost every day brings friends, relatives, and people from her temple to Lee's shows and exhibits. "We live with my parents-in-law," Lee says. "I am very grateful because I am able to do what I want to outside the house and the take care of things at home. It's the Buddhist concept of family support, and such harmony between the generations is quite unusual these days."

  "Mandala Revelation," Lee's next major solo show, was held in 1999. If the underlying theme of the 1995 show was Buddhism in general, that of the 1999 show was the Lotus Sutra. "Reading this magnificent epic," Lee says, "moved me to tears and great joy because it convinced me that every human being can become a buddha. It gave me absolute confidence in human beings because of their innate buddha-natures. I felt waves of sincere gratitude that I was able to encounter the Dharma in this life." The sutra also reminded her of Mount Gridhrakuta (Vulture Peak), which she had visited in India.

  Lee based her show on the oldest and most elaborate Korean Buddhist ceremony, called youngsanjae, which is performed is praise of the Buddha and the truth of his teaching. It commemorates a spectacle that took place twenty-five centuries ago on Mount Gridhrakuta (called Youngsan in Korean), the auspicious vulture-shaped peak in India. The purpose of the ceremony, Lee explains, is to bring the Buddha's teachings to all beings, living and dead, through song and dance. In this way, the spirits of the dead are led to salvation and paradise, flowers rain down from the heavens, and the earth shakes six times to celebrate the joyous event. The ceremony, once an occasion for a village festival, starts with the symbolic arrival of buddhas and bodhisattvas from all over the universe, followed by the ritual cleansing of the dead spirits. Tapestries, paintings, and handmade paper lotuses and other flowers decorate the temple courtyard and hall, and chants, songs, and dances are performed. The spirits listen to the teachings and are saved.

  "Although it is a profound religious ceremony dedicated to saving the world and even the spirits of the dead," Lee says, "the youngsanjae is a composite art form executed in festival-like atmosphere. It is amazing to me that the Lotus Sutra Deals with universal space and time and encompasses buddhas and bodhisattvas from different universes. Buddhism has taught me to take a broad view of thing."

  Lee approached her show, which was held at a Seoul gallery, as if it was an opera of a Zen ritual. She devoted two years to preparation, designing nineteen costumes, as well as the setting and lighting, and commissioning the music and dances. Painting the costumes for the 1995 show by hand had taught her a lesson; for these costumes she stenciled patterns on black tussah silk and sheer organdy. Though she used the traditional Korean colors of res, blue, yellow, black, and white on her costumes, she muted them with gray to eliminate any hint of shamanism and make the colors compatible with the black fabric.  
  Models, posing as bodhisattvas, wore nine of the costumes; the other ten were displayed on the first floor of the two-floor gallery, which was strewn with paper lotuses. Lee had her elegant bodhisattvas walk down the stairs from the second floor, to the surprise of the audience seated among the paper lotuses below.
 
Audience reaction was overwhelming; ordinary spectators and art critics alike were stunned and moved. Most gratifying to Lee, the show made people think about what Buddhist design could and should be. There often is little difference, she points out, between the refined art that can be seen in temple halls and the inexpensive souvenirs sold at the temples. She believes, however, that art based on the Buddha's teaching should be infused with the sincere compassion manifested by all the buddhas who have appeared in the world.

  Lee sees "Mandala Revelation" as a new interpretation of the Lotus Sutra for the twenty-first century. Her aim in creating the pieces was to express the might of the truth of the Dharma and praise the Buddha and his great mercy. Understanding religion by means of art, she believes, is the best and easiest way to disseminate Buddhism, or any religion.

  "I want to serve people while expressing the Buddha's words to the world though my art. My dream is one day to have a wonderful museum filled with my Buddhist designs, with a Korean-style teahouse and lotus pond.



패션을 초월하는 디자인


                                                                                                                                                                                                                             제끄린느 뤼약


불교의 진정한 의미를 뒤늦게 알게 되었다는 한국의 예술가, 그녀가 디자인에서 추구하고자하는 것은 세련된 향취를 지닌 가운데서도 가슴을 울리는 부처와 보살의 이미지다.



한국 예술계의 밝은 빛, 이 기향은 신실한 불교적 감성을 바탕으로 옷을 디자인을 한다. 이 길을 걸어 온지 10여 년, 이 보기 드믄 예술가는 ‘웨어러블 아트’라 불리는 장르를  불교적 감성으로 장엄해 왔다. 그녀에게 있어서 창조 작업을 하는 일, 다시 말해 옷을 짓는 일은 모두 부처와 인간을 받드는 일이라 작가는 힘주어 말한다.

“사람들이 제가 만든 옷을 입거나 보면서 자연스럽게 부처님의 가르침에 접할 수 있다면 좋겠어요.”


옷을 디자인하는 조형 작업이 불교적 진리와 만나 어떻게 표현되어져야 할 것인가를 모색하기 위해 작가는 외롭고 긴 탐색 여행을 감수해야 했다.

70년대 후반, 서울대학에서 조각을 전공한 그녀는 늘 아쉬움을 갖고 있던 색채 공부의 꿈을 안고 미국으로 건너가 시카고 예술대학에서 판화를 전공하게 된다. 하지만 인체에 해로운 산(acid)과 솔벤트로 수작업해야 하는 작업환경이 정말 싫었기 때문에 용기를 내어 보스톤에 위치한 School of Fashion Design에서 다시 의상공부를 시작하게 되고 비로소 패션디자인이 그녀가 꼭하고 싶었던 분야라는 확신을 갖게 되었다. 졸업 후 아동복 디자이너로 일하게 되지만, 남편이 첫 직장을 독일의 대학에서 갖게 되면서 함께 떠나게 된다. 미국과 독일에서 9 년의 세월을 보내고 한국으로 영구 귀국한 그녀는 오히려 한국에 돌아와 그동안 미루어 놓았던 자신의 정체성에 대해 정신적인 방황의 시기를 겪게 된다.

“모국에 돌아와 한동안 혼란스러웠어요. 제 뿌리가 무엇인지, 또 무엇을 해야할지,.... 소위 힘이 센 나라들에서 우리를 바라보는 시각과 제가 자랑스러워하던 조국과는 큰 차이가 있음을  느꼈던 거죠.....그래서 우리 역사에 관심을 갖게 되었고 서양에 중심을 둔 미술 교육을 받았기 때문에 한국의 전통과 문화에 대해서는 거의 알지 못했다는 사실에 비로소 주목하게 된 것입니다“.


그 즈음 독실한 불교신자였던 시어머니께서 불교를 공부해 볼 것을 권했다.

"어머님께서는 저희 유학시절 안부의 편지를 써 보내시곤 했는데 그것은 매우 일상적인 것들이었지만 어딘지 모르게 향내가 스미어 있었어요. 나중에  보니 그것이 불교가 갖는 매력이었죠. 하지만 그 당시만 해도 불교와 무속 신앙을 혼동하고 있었고 특히 무속의 강렬한 색채 이미지 때문에 선뜻 마음이 끌리지 않았어요."

마지못해 시작하게 된 불교 공부였지만 이를 계기로 그녀의 인생은 큰 전환점을 맞이하게  된다.

“저는 불교를 접하고 정말 충격을 받았습니다. 외국생활을 하기 전에 불교를 알지 못했다는 사실이 분할 지경이었죠. 진작 불교를 알고 갔더라면 당당하고 신나는 유학 생활을 할 수 있었을텐데........ 하지만 이제라도 부처님의 가르침을 만났다는 사실이 정말 고맙고 행복합니다. 불교는 모든 이들에게 불성이 있기 때문에 누구나 원하는 일을 해낼 수 있다고 가르칩니다. 저는 제 삶이 다할 때까지 이 세상에 보여드리고 싶은 작품들이 정말 많아요. "

한국에 돌아오면서 강의를 맡게 되고 이어 디자인 석사과정을 밟게 된다. 그 후부터 현재까지 여러 차례의 개인전시와 쇼, 국내외의 많은 전시와 공연에도 참가한다.  1996 년부터는 한성대학교 의생활학부의 교수로 일하게 되며, 창작 의상과 디자인 프로세스 등을 강의한다. 그녀는 지아비와 함께 국내 외 성지순례 여행을 다니는 일에도 열심이다.  순례를 통해서 불교미술의 풍요로움에 감사하고 신앙의 깊이를 더하는 좋은 기회로 삼고 있다.


1994년 봄부터 일본 문화 패션 칼리지에서 1년간 공부를 하는 기회를 갖게 된다. 처음에는 망설였지만 일본이 문화적으로 다른 나라의 동경의 대상이 되고 또 경제적 안정에서 오는 풍요로움이 혹시 불교 신앙에서 오는 것이 아닌가 하는데 생각이 미치자 꼭 일본에서의 생활을 통해 체험해 보고 싶었다고 한다. 일본의 재가 불자들이 일상생활에서 불교의 가르침을 실천하고 친절하게 남을 배려하는 모습은 큰 감동을 주었다. 그녀가 체험한 진정한 일본의 불교는 경전만이 아닌 사람들의 친절한 행동에 있음을 보았다고 말한다.


1995년 봄, 서울로 돌아오자 곧 개인전 ‘피안을 향하여’를 준비하는데 몰두한다. 9달 동안 9벌의 작품을 제작하였는데 모두 한국 불교 의식에 사용하는 큰 탱화인 괘불(야외에 거는 큰 불화)에서 영감을 받은 것들이다. 이 당시의 작품들은 면 소재 위에 직접 손으로 그렸는데 드라마틱하면서도 아주 섬세하고 세련된 이미지의 아미타불, 석가모니, 관세음보살, 지장보살, 연꽃을 들고 있는 무드라(우주와 하나가 되는 손의 표정) 등의 모습을 표현하고 있다.


작가는 그녀가 겪었던 개인적인 정체성의 혼란에 대한 해답과 한국의 미술, 문화, 역사에 대한 진정한 가치를 불교 안에서 찾아냈다.

전통 불화 작가는 불교적 상상력의 폭을 넓혀 나가는 바탕 위에 그 시대의 감성을 표현해 내야하고 현대 불화작가들도 현대적인 감성과 전통의 풍요로움이 어우러진 작품을 창조해 낼 수 있어야 한다고 강조한다. 그녀의 영감은 한국과 아시아 지역의 불화에서 오지만 그 이미지를 그대로 모방하는 것은 아니다. 그녀의 손끝에서 창조되는 불 보살의 얼굴은 한국의 여느 불화에서 보이는 전통적인 모습과는 확실히 다르다. 1995년의 개인전 ‘피안을 향하여’를 보러 왔던 스님들은 불보살의 전형을 벗어난 낯선 모습을 좋아하지 않았지만 작가는 그런 비판을 충분히 감수해 내야할 과제로 여겼다.

"저의 디자인 작업이 생활 속에 살아 있고, 또 사람들이 가슴으로 느끼도록 하는 것이 제가 할 일입니다. 저는 부처님의 가르침을 세상에 알리는 메신저이고 싶어요.  디자인하는 일은 저에게는 신앙과도 같습니다. "

그럼에도 불구하고 그녀는 '불교 예술가'라고 불리는 것을 좋아하지 않는다.

"제 작품은 불교인들만을 위한 것이 아니라 온 세상 사람들을 향하여 열려 있습니다.“

조선 후기 이후 한국의 불교와 무속 신앙의 대상물에는 모두 지나칠 만큼의 강렬한 색상을 사용하는 경향이 나타난다고 한다. 이에 비해 그녀는 자연스런 문양의 색을 나타내기 위해 보색을 함께 사용하거나 회색 빛 기운으로 채도를 낮추어 자연스럽고 편안한 색을 만들어 사용했다. 이는 작가가  한국 불화의 최고봉을 고려 불화의 은은하고 화사한 아름다움에 두는 것과 무관하지 않을 것이다.

"저는 에메랄드 그린이나 아쿠아 블루의 세련된 맛도 좋아하지만 너무 과하게 사용하지 않도록 조심합니다. 이에 비해 주황빛이나 녹색 빛은 아주 한국적인 느낌을 주는 색이죠." 1995년 전시에서는 묘한 쉐이드의 녹색과 주황색을 주로 사용했는데 자연스러운 세월의 흔적을 나타내기 위해서 밝은 빛과 어두운 빛을 함께 섞어 표현했다.

"잿빛을 사용하지 않고는 작업을 할 수 없을 것 같아요."라고 작가는 힘주어 말한다. 또 그림이 완성된 후에  갈라진 모양의 크랙을 의도적으로 그려 넣어 오래된 느낌을 더한다.

"세월의 흔적, 그 미묘한 빛깔은 너무 아름다워 말로 표현키 어렵죠."


작가가 자랑스러워하는 후원자인 시어머니는 매일 친구와 친척들 그리고 사원의 친구들과 함께 전시장을 들러 격려해 주었다.

"저는 시부모님과 함께 살지요. 제가 밖에서 활동하는 동안 부모님께서는 집안을 돌보아 주시는데 정말 감사하게 생각하고 있어요. 각자의 역할을 즐겁게 해 내는 일, 이것이  불교적 의미의 가족 사랑이며, 그런 세대간의 조화로움은  한국 사회의 좋은 전통 중의 하나입니다"


또 다른 주요 발표였던 '영취산의 환희'는 1999년에 열렸다. 1995년의 개인전이 불교 전반에 관한 내용을 작품화했다면 1999년의 ‘영취산의 환희’는 법화경에 근거를 둔 영산재를 새롭게 해석 접근한 미술의상 쇼 및 전시였다.

"웅장한 서사시에 다름없는 법화경을 읽고 감동의 눈물을 흘렸어요. 모든 인간은 부처가 될 수 있다는 확신을 주었기 때문에 불성이 있는 인간은 완벽한 자신감을 가질 수 있지요. 저의 생애에 이런 진리를 만날 수 있었다는 사실에 큰 감사의 기쁨이 물결칩니다.“


법화경을 이야기하면서 그녀는 89년 인도를 방문했을 당시의 영취산을 떠올린다. ‘영취산의 환희’는 가장 오래되고 아름다운  한국 불교 의식인 영산재에 근거했는데  25세기 전에 인도의 라지기르 지방의 독수리 모양의 산봉우리인 영취산에서 부처가 베풀었던  수승한 진리를 찬탄하며 일어나는 장엄한 장면들을 의식화하여 신라 시대부터 베풀어 온 것이다. 이 의식은 모든 살아있는 중생들과 죽은 자들을 진리의 노래와 춤을 통해서 부처님의 가르침으로 인도하려는데 목적이 있다. 이 의식은  살아있는 생명뿐 아니라 죽은 이의 영혼까지도 구제하려는 종교의식이지만, 역사적으로 마을의 축제 같은 분위기를 조성해 왔으며 형태 면에서는 종합적인 예술형태를 지니고 있다.

작가는 법화경이 우주적인 공간과 시간을 자유자재로 다루고 있다는 것이 놀라웠고 덕분에 사물을 바라보는 확장된 견해를 갖도록 해주었다고 술회한다.


서울의 한 갤러리에서 열린 쇼는 마치 무용극에 선 의식을 접목한 듯이 독특하게 진행되었다. 작가는 쇼를 위해서 2년여의 준비과정을 거쳤는데 20벌의 작품을 디자인하였을 뿐만 아니라 설치 미술을 비롯한 무대의 설정, 미술 의상 쇼와 안무를 위한 음악 곡의 선택, 안무자의 설정도 세심하게 배려하였다.

1995년의 작품들은 모두 옷 위에 직접 손으로 그려 작업한 데 반해 99년의 ‘영취산의 환희‘는 대중들이 생활화할 수 있는 의상 디자인의 개발과 현대적인 분위기의 연출을 위해서 엷은 흑색 반투명의 노방과 수직 실크 위에 19작품의 각 모티브에 적합한 한국적 분위기의 색채들을 사용하여 문양 디자인하였다.

2층으로 된 화랑의 구조를 최대 활용하여  극락 세계로 상징되는 2층의 높은 곳에서 아래 층의 사바세계로 내려오는 계단의 난간을 모두 전통 기법으로 접은 지화(채색 종이 꽃)로 아름답게 꾸몄다. 채화의 장엄은 중생들을 위해 자비와 연민으로 사바세계로 내려오시는 불보살을 환영하는 우리들의 마음을 상징한다. 연화세계를 꿈꾸는 연꽃 무늬의 11작품은 낮은 곳에 전시되고 우아한 자태의 9명의 불 보살들이 극락의 계단에서 내려올 때 아래에서 숨죽이며 이를 바라보는 관객들은 놀람과 감동으로 압도되었다. 일반적인 패션 쇼를 생각하고 취재하러 온 기자들과 비평가들은 본적이 없는 새로운 형식의 쇼를 기록하고 전달하기에 여념이 없었다.

작가에게 있어서 가장 감사한 것은 ‘영취산의 환희’를 마치고 불교적 디자인이 이처럼 현대인의 삶 속에 좋은 감동으로 다가오고 또 생활화할 수 있다는 가능성을 확인시켜 준 일이었다고 한다.  그녀는 작품전의 의의를  “21세기에 걸맞는 영산재의 새로운 해석이 될 수 있다면.....”하고 조심스런 의견을 피력한다.

그녀가 추구하고자 하는 작품은 진리의 위대함을 보여주고 부처를 찬양하기 위한 것이다. 예술을 통해서 종교를 이해한다면 그것이 가장 감동적인 최상의 포교가 될 것이다.

"저는 제가 하는 작업을 통해서 부처님의 가르침을 시각화하고 싶습니다.

저의 꿈은 불교적 향취가 가득한 아름다운 박물관을 회향하는 것입니다.

불교의 정신과 불교적 디자인으로 장엄한 갤러리를 조성하여 박물관을 찾는 이들에게 극락의 환희로운 감동을 드리고 싶습니다. 이 세상 곳곳에 여러 훌륭한 박물관이 있지만 제가 꿈꾸는 장소야말로 불교적 영감이 가득한 의상 박물관이 될 것입니다. 이곳이 널리 알려진다면 부처님께서도 좋아하실 거예요.

저는 다시 태어나도 이 일을 계속 할 것입니다."



 
Trackback Address :: http://www.art-to-wear.pe.kr/blog/trackback/88

Name
Password
address
  Secret
 
 
1 ..72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 .. 140
 
Copyrightⓒ 2007 Art to Wear- Lee, Kihyang All Rights Reserved.